Author: The Harman Eye Clinic

The Harman Eye Clinic was founded in 1984 and continues to be an important contributor to extraordinary service and technology for refractive surgery and eye care.

Been on the fence about iLASIK?

Wonder whether LASIK is safe?  We understand!  We have been there.  And, we can help you get off that fence once and for all.  We have answers that are tailored just for you!

FREE iLASIK CONSULTATION WITH SURGEON

“A free 2-hour consultation is waiting to be claimed by you!
Receive a PERSONAL summary of your surgeon’s recommendations.pexels-photo-616953.jpeg

This free consultation is valued well over $300, with diagnostic testing. You will receive answers that are created especially for you, with your vision, health history, current medical conditions, lifestyle and vision expectations, in mind.  You’ll be talking to  Dr. Ballon, Dr. Wietharn or Dr. Bajenova.  They will meet with you at the end of your diagnostic testing, education and measurements.

FREE iLASIK CONSULTATION WITH SURGEON

 

Your visit will look like this:

  • A call from our refractive consultant to answer any questions before your visit.
  • An email with special links to: 1) a patient portal in order to complete past and current medical conditions, 2) a patient informed consent video with short quiz to help clarify your expectations
  • Check in and be welcomed by our staff.  There will be no charge to you at this visit.
  • A professional ophthalmic assistant will take specific measurements with our state-of-the-art iLASIK equipment, while answering any of your questions during each test.

FREE iLASIK CONSULTATION WITH SURGEON

  • Your pupils will be dilated with strong dilating drops that usually last well into the next day.  You may wish to bring a loved-one along to do the driving afterwards.
  • Once all of your medical tests and measurements have been completed and you are well-dilated, your surgeon will meet with you to answer any of your questions.
  • You will leave knowing that iLASIK is a procedure recommended by your surgeon or you will be told the reasons why iLASIK is not a good choice for your particular medical status.  Either way, there is no obligation to move forward with iLASIK.
  • It will be the best 2-hours of time you ever spent for you will be off the fence once and for all.

 

iLASIK eBook 2018!

 

THEC New Year’s Letter

Download:  Patient Annual New Year Letter

2018 Patient Annual New Year Letter

A New Way to Attend Seminars!

FACEBOOK LIVE

Wouldn’t you love to have your own personal assistant who would guide you through the mysteries of eye surgery?

There is a new way to get questions answered here at The Harman Eye Clinic in Arlington, Washington!

For several months, our seasoned Refractive Consultant, Pam Miller, has bravely entered the world of LIVE Facebook every Friday afternoon.  She eagerly meets up with patients, past, present and those who will visit in the future.

Each Friday, Pam posts the time she will go live.  You are invited to post your requests for topics to cover during the live show on Facebook.  There is no question too small or too big to ask.  We can talk intelligently about iLASIK, cataract surgery, advanced technology, lifestyle lens implants, glaucoma, macular degeneration, irritated and red eyes, dry eyes, whatever interests you at the moment.

The Surgeons at The Harman Eye Clinic  are convinced that a well-informed patient is a happy patient.  You are the reason we are here.  We hope you take advantage of our Facebook service soon.

To go to our Facebook page, click here.  When you like us on Facebook, you will get a notification announcement of the exact time on Friday.

Five ways to prepare for iLASIK!

Flyer 11-2017

A Happy Patient Is An Informed Patient

watch-informed-consent-001You might ask, “What are possible temporary side effects after cataract surgery?”   To answer this question and to help you prepare when you talk with your surgeon, here are frequent questions and concerns patients ask about after surgery.

BLURRED VISION:  what are common causes of blurred vision after cataract surgery?

  • Dropless cataract surgery is routinely performed at The Harman Eye Clinic, and causes black dots in the vision for at least day or two after surgery.  Patients are instructed to sit upright for at least a few hours when the get home to help the medicine settle to the bottom of the eye, like a snow globe.
  • Dilation lasts for at least a day or two after cataract surgery and commonly causes blurred vision.
  • PCO or posterior capsular opacification occurs 10-20% after routine cataract surgery.  It causes glare at night, but is curable by a simple YAG laser procedure that takes 2 minutes to perform, but an hour and a half for the paperwork!
  • CME or cystoid macular edema occurs about 1% of the time after routine cataract surgery.  It causes difficulty reading and even distance vision.  Risk factors include diabetes, ERM (epiretinal membrane), prior retinal surgery and possibly cigarette smoking.  It often can be cured with topical steroid and anti-inflammatory eye drops.
  • Residual refractive error may cause blur until new spectacles are prescribed.  If a monofocal lens is chosen for best distance vision, then near vision will be blurred (so called presbyopia) until readers are used.
  • Dry Eye syndrome is a life long condition, that may cause fluctuating vision, and may be worse at least temporarily after cataract surgery.  It is often exacerbated by prescription eye drops (especially generic drops such as ketorolac), but we are seeing much less dry eye problems since switching to dropless surgery.
  • ARMD (age related macular degeneration) or ERM may also limit vision due to aging changes in the retina.

DYSPHOTOPSIAS are unwanted visual phenomena occurring after routine cataract surgery.

  • Negative dysphotopsia are likened to “horse blinders” with a shadow or dark crescent on the side and usually subside within days or weeks. They are thought to be more common in square edged lens implants, but have been reported in all types of lens implants, however they are not dangerous.
  • Positive dysphotopsia are less common, and are often described as an arc of light under certain lighting conditions.

REBOUND IRITIS IS INFLAMMATION that occurs usually 2 to 3 weeks after cataract surgery.

  • It is thought to be a result of the dropless medicine wearing off, especially found in darkly pigmented patients.  It happens in less than 10% of patients who have dropless surgery and is treated with topical steroids.  This is the best reason for patients to keep their 3-week postoperative appointment after surgery.

For more information.  download a free copy of our Cataract Surgery Patient Workbook, here.

Or take time to read, A Patient’s Journal – Cataract Surgery

 

 

Second Surgery, Day One – A Journal VI

I had my one day post op after my second surgery. My vision was pretty blurry due to a bit of swelling on the cornea, so I’ve waited to share.

Needle and threadNow when you decide on having a “lifestyle lens,” you really have to think about how you spend your time and what your particular vision needs are. Myself, I work on a computer and interact with patients. Ok, that’s 40 hours of my week. Typically, I’m awake about 122 hours in a week, so that accounts for 1/3 of my time. Driving: an hour a day. Family time includes reading, watching television, board games. Weekends are your typical housekeeping chores. Hobbies? Making quilts! Accurately measuring, cutting, sewing and pressing. Hand sewing the bindings on finished quilts. For me, being able to thread a needle and follow a line of stitching was vital.

Quilting

These Symfony lenses have the ability to let you see for reading, computer and driving. But super fine like I wanted required either cheaters (non-prescription magnifying glasses you find in a drug store) or, choosing a power for the implant that would provide that. Choosing that option may require glasses for driving. That is the choice I made.

Right now, I’m threading needles and hand sewing along that line of stitching!

My advice to those of you considering a Lifestyle lens? Evaluate your life! What are your visual needs? Communicate this to your surgeon. You may be an avid outdoor enthusiast, golfer, pilot or ham operator! Reading may be your passion. There’s as many lifestyles as there are people, each one unique and important.

I still have a couple weeks for my vision to stabilize, but right now I have what I can only describe as “normal” vision. I’m seeing what I want to see. How awesome is that?!?

 

 

One Week & 2nd Eye Surgery – A Journal V

One week later. Scheduled for a one week post op and second surgery. Depending on how your eye heals, your personal preference and the difference between your eyes, surgeries can be scheduled 1-3 weeks or further apart. I was fortunate to be 1 week.

I have noticed a lot of struggle between my new eye and the other one this past week. It felt like the new eye was doing about 90% of the work and the old one was trying to keep up. Those floaters from the medication last week? They were gone 3 days after surgery. What was really cool was turning on my side to read in bed without my glasses getting in the way!

The halos are much smaller around lights, more something I observe but not causing any difficulty, All in all, it’s been a great week between surgeries!

My one week check up was great. Healing well, seeing 20/20 without correction. My biggest hobby is sewing quilt tops, so I’ve asked my surgeon to set my lens power for reading or “near” vision to help me with my hand sewing.

My surgical experience was every bit as good as the first time. I even slept a bit before and during! I still don’t remember a great deal of what went on in the OR… and I can say that because I know what happens since I work there! The medication in my eye this time is more like a cloud over the outside half of my vision. I had a foreign body sensation which I knew was the incision from surgery, and artificial tears took care of that.

I’ll check in again tomorrow and let you know how I am with the dilation gone. I’m still ecstatic with my surgery. I’m very proud to be a part of the Team at The Harman Eye Clinic. It’s a blessing to help others with improving their vision, and I’m one of many staff members who have experienced the benefit of various procedures we can do. iLASIK, Refractive Lens Exchange, Cataract surgery with an assortment of lens options. It’s all good!

Second Surgery, Day One – A Journal VI

Cataract Surgery One Day Post-Op – A Journal IV

Day one after surgery. I was so excited, I didn’t sleep well. Realizing how dim my vision had become without me even realizing it blew me away! Colors are so much more…colorful! I couldn’t wait to go to work and see my quilts on display. Even washing my hands, the water seemed clearer. I got in the car to drive to work and when I turned on the headlights, the windshield looked clearer!

Amazing.

I was told to expect halos around lights for awhile. Yep, have those. But they don’t bother me. The floaters are just on the edge of my vision and not hard to ignore. Decided to see if I could go through the day without my glasses. I read the Bible without glasses (and not a large print version, either!). I worked all day in the office.

Saw my surgeon for the one day checkup. My best corrected vision before surgery was 20/25 with a fair amount of astigmatism. Now I can see 20/20 and a negligible amount of astigmatism. No glasses. I can see to read, work on the computer and drive. It’s like “normal” vision but so much clearer! If it continues to get better in the next few weeks as my vision stabilizes, well I can’t imagine.

I’m excited about life! Did the dim vision cause a bit of depression? Well, today I tried to give a hug to everyone I work with to thank them for the part they play in helping people like me see better. What a gift and a blessing.

Tap here to read A Journal V

Cataract Surgery Day – A Journal III

Surgery Day. Must admit, I’m a bit anxious. Tossed and turned all night.

No coffee or breakfast this morning. Just a couple meds with a sip of water. Brushed my teeth and rinsed my mouth out, being careful to not swallow any of that tasty toothpaste!

My co-workers learned I’m not as perky when I am caffeine deprived! But I took a couple Tylenol with my meds to keep the headache minimized and made it through to admission time.

The staff are fantastic! I don’t think I was ever alone. Super supportive, keeping me informed of what was happening along the way. There were a bunch of eye drops that got easier each batch because there was always a numbing drop first. IV, monitors placed for heart rhythm, SAT and a blood pressure cuff. You know, surgery stuff! I was a bit chilly and a hand warmer and the heated chair were perfect. Even got a bit of a massage from the chair.

Seemed like no time at all and I was fitted with O2 tubing and being escorted into the Operating Room. Normally there are 4 folks in the OR with a patient: the Surgeon, Anesthesia, Scrub Tech and Circulator. As I said, never alone.

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There was a little shuffling around to get comfortable in the chair and after that I really don’t remember much! I do remember seeing a really cool pattern (like a beautiful wallpaper), some colored lights, the surgeon saying we were going to do a final test, doing that and then being told the lens was in. Then the slight sensation of the medication being placed in my eye and we’re done!

Out to the post op area with another great staff member who recorded vitals while I had a cup of coffee and a “continental breakfast.” With strong vitals and me feeling good, time to disconnect the IV and head home.

Now this dropless medicine manifests differently for everyone. For me it’s like oil on top of a bowl of water being swirled around. At first it looked like mountain ranges, later it was bubbles, and even later just a patch of black dots! I was told to go home and rest in an upright position for a couple hours so that the medicine could settle to the bottom of the eye.

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Headed home, noticing my eye felt a bit scratchy as the numbing wore off. Laid down with a bunch of pillows to keep my head elevated and took a short nap, woke up feeling great. My husband and I picked up our grandson and went to Taekwondo; back to normal except no driving today.

What a great experience! From checking in to checking out, the staff are very caring, friendly and professional. Yes, I work with them every day, and from a patient perspective, I’m proud to say GREAT JOB!

Tomorrow, back to work and I’ll see the doctor for my first follow up visit and I’ll keep you posted as I continue this journey and the second surgery next week.

My biggest WOW right now it how bright white is with my new eye! The old eye looks like someone turned the dimmer switch down. This is exciting!

Tap here to read A Journal IV

Cataract Surgery – A Journal II

Joyce Bowley

Joyce Bowley, ASC Patient Surgery Coordination

Getting ready for surgery day. I’m between the age of 60-65 with no health issues, so I was able to have the need for my MD to clear me for outpatient surgery deferred. After the schedule was set, the nurse sat and explained my pre-op instructions to me: morning meds with a sip of water, nothing to eat or drink past midnight, the need for a driver. They will start an IV, so I’ve got to drink lots of (hydrating) fluids the day before to ensure the best veins.

Now, since I work in the Surgery Center, I volunteered to work until it was time for me to be admitted. The only problem I can foresee is a caffeine headache when my body realizes it’s not getting its daily dose. I went for years eating one meal a day, so I don’t see a problem with not eating until after surgery. I certainly don’t want to risk being nauseous while my eye is being worked on!

I have been approved for what’s called “dropless” surgery. This means I won’t have to pick up any prescriptions for a set of eye drops (antibiotic, steroid & NSAID) to use before and after surgery. Instead, the medication will be placed in the back of my eye at the time of surgery. Thank goodness! While I’ve figured out the best way to put drops in my eye, remembering to do so 4 times a day would probably require hiring a personal assistant!

Am I nervous about having surgery? Well, I am fortunate to know this team of surgeons and staff and be familiar with the entire process from A-Z. I have total faith in my surgeons skill. In the back of mind, I know that any surgery comes with risks and possible complications. I choose not to dwell on negatives. What would be the point? I will pray for the surgeon and his team and let God do the worrying. (This is what got me through my two children doing 8 tours with the Army in Iraq & Afghanistan without a nervous breakdown.)

My surgeon has told me I’ll need to be diligent in taking care of my dry eyes. For me, the hours I spend staring at computer screens has led to dry eyes. Seems I forget to blink! I do take fish oil every day as he’s recommended, which has certainly helped. But surgery will disturb the surface of my eye, so I will stock up on Preservative Free artificial tears for use after surgery. Plus, years ago I did have an injury to my left eye that has caused what is called “recurrent corneal erosion.” I used to have yearly flare ups, but since I started with the fish oil I haven’t had any problems. I’m aware this problem is ever present and I need to be responsible for constant care.

Other than that, I think I’m ready!

Tap here to read A Journal III