Intraocular Lens Implants

Latest Edition of a Patient Guide to Cataract Surgery

Download your own copy of our latest edition of

“A Patient Guide to Cataract Surgery”APatientGuideToCataractSurgery

Latest edition of A Patient Guide to Cataract Surgery

Download your own copy of our latest edition of A Patient Guide to Cataract Surgery!

5 steps to help sort out your lens implant options with Cataract Surgery

Senior Woman Looking Over Turtleneck Sweater

Which lens implant will match your lifestyle?

First Step. Take a cataract assessment, (see below) You may be experiencing the effects of cataracts; everything may appear fuzzier, dimmer and driving at night may be an unwelcome challenge. Do you think you may have cataracts?  Learn  how they affect your life by taking the Cataract Surgery Self-Evalutation.

Second Step: Are you aware that when you opt for the traditional, standard lens implant, you will probably need glasses afterwards to accomplish all ranges of vision.  In other words, even though your lens will brighten and clear up your vision, you will need glasses to see various focal lengths with best vision; i.e., up close, intermediate and in the distance.  If you like wearing glasses, this may be the lens implant for you.

Third Step: Consider this, if you opt for the advanced technology, like the Tecnis Symfony, lens implant, you can reduce your dependence on glasses for distance, near and most places in between. You may find there are times that you wish to wear glasses to refine your vision, and this is still considered by you and your surgeon as a successful outcome.

Fourth Step: Review your overall health. It plays an important part in reducing your dependence on wearing glasses. Allergies, medicines, even over-the-counter medicines, health problems, all can affect your dependence on glasses. Your eye doctor will be able to address these concerns; it is important that you take note of your doctor’s recommendations.

Fifth Step, and this is most important: Your surgeon can provide a lens designed for an extended range of vision. Expect to keep an active relationship with your doctor by following your surgeon’s recommendations after surgery, maintaining your health to the best of your ability, and working with your doctor in order to sustain continued happy vision.

Whether you choose a standard lens or a premium, advanced technology lens implant, most patients report a brighter, more colorful world after surgery. Your next task is to continue to educate yourself by downloading a complimentary eBook, visiting our website, http://www.20Better.com, or calling upon one of our Refractive Counselors at 360-474-2561. An informed patient is a happy patient!

Barbara Aliaga, a member of The Harman Eye Clinic since 1989, chose an advanced technology lens implant with cataract surgery in 2014. She writes for The Harman Eye Clinic blog and website since their inception and is currently doing so without wearing glasses!

A Happy Patient Is An Informed Patient

watch-informed-consent-001You might ask, “What are possible temporary side effects after cataract surgery?”   To answer this question and to help you prepare when you talk with your surgeon, here are frequent questions and concerns patients ask about after surgery.

BLURRED VISION:  what are common causes of blurred vision after cataract surgery?

  • Dropless cataract surgery is routinely performed at The Harman Eye Clinic, and causes black dots in the vision for at least day or two after surgery.  Patients are instructed to sit upright for at least a few hours when the get home to help the medicine settle to the bottom of the eye, like a snow globe.
  • Dilation lasts for at least a day or two after cataract surgery and commonly causes blurred vision.
  • PCO or posterior capsular opacification occurs 10-20% after routine cataract surgery.  It causes glare at night, but is curable by a simple YAG laser procedure that takes 2 minutes to perform, but an hour and a half for the paperwork!
  • CME or cystoid macular edema occurs about 1% of the time after routine cataract surgery.  It causes difficulty reading and even distance vision.  Risk factors include diabetes, ERM (epiretinal membrane), prior retinal surgery and possibly cigarette smoking.  It often can be cured with topical steroid and anti-inflammatory eye drops.
  • Residual refractive error may cause blur until new spectacles are prescribed.  If a monofocal lens is chosen for best distance vision, then near vision will be blurred (so called presbyopia) until readers are used.
  • Dry Eye syndrome is a life long condition, that may cause fluctuating vision, and may be worse at least temporarily after cataract surgery.  It is often exacerbated by prescription eye drops (especially generic drops such as ketorolac), but we are seeing much less dry eye problems since switching to dropless surgery.
  • ARMD (age related macular degeneration) or ERM may also limit vision due to aging changes in the retina.

DYSPHOTOPSIAS are unwanted visual phenomena occurring after routine cataract surgery.

  • Negative dysphotopsia are likened to “horse blinders” with a shadow or dark crescent on the side and usually subside within days or weeks. They are thought to be more common in square edged lens implants, but have been reported in all types of lens implants, however they are not dangerous.
  • Positive dysphotopsia are less common, and are often described as an arc of light under certain lighting conditions.

REBOUND IRITIS IS INFLAMMATION that occurs usually 2 to 3 weeks after cataract surgery.

  • It is thought to be a result of the dropless medicine wearing off, especially found in darkly pigmented patients.  It happens in less than 10% of patients who have dropless surgery and is treated with topical steroids.  This is the best reason for patients to keep their 3-week postoperative appointment after surgery.

For more information.  download a free copy of our Cataract Surgery Patient Workbook, here.

Or take time to read, A Patient’s Journal – Cataract Surgery

 

 

One Week & 2nd Eye Surgery – A Journal V

One week later. Scheduled for a one week post op and second surgery. Depending on how your eye heals, your personal preference and the difference between your eyes, surgeries can be scheduled 1-3 weeks or further apart. I was fortunate to be 1 week.

I have noticed a lot of struggle between my new eye and the other one this past week. It felt like the new eye was doing about 90% of the work and the old one was trying to keep up. Those floaters from the medication last week? They were gone 3 days after surgery. What was really cool was turning on my side to read in bed without my glasses getting in the way!

The halos are much smaller around lights, more something I observe but not causing any difficulty, All in all, it’s been a great week between surgeries!

My one week check up was great. Healing well, seeing 20/20 without correction. My biggest hobby is sewing quilt tops, so I’ve asked my surgeon to set my lens power for reading or “near” vision to help me with my hand sewing.

My surgical experience was every bit as good as the first time. I even slept a bit before and during! I still don’t remember a great deal of what went on in the OR… and I can say that because I know what happens since I work there! The medication in my eye this time is more like a cloud over the outside half of my vision. I had a foreign body sensation which I knew was the incision from surgery, and artificial tears took care of that.

I’ll check in again tomorrow and let you know how I am with the dilation gone. I’m still ecstatic with my surgery. I’m very proud to be a part of the Team at The Harman Eye Clinic. It’s a blessing to help others with improving their vision, and I’m one of many staff members who have experienced the benefit of various procedures we can do. iLASIK, Refractive Lens Exchange, Cataract surgery with an assortment of lens options. It’s all good!

Second Surgery, Day One – A Journal VI

What is an extended depth of focus lens? TECNIS SYMFONY®

 

An extended depth of focus lens is an integral part of the Lifestyle Premium lens implant menu at The Harman Eye Clinic in Arlington WA.

In 2016 the Food and Drug Administration approved two new types of intraocular lenses for use in cataract surgery—the and TECNIS SYMFONY® toric lens implants.

The Symfony® intraocular lens is the option of choice that I can offer my patients to improve their vision following cataract surgery, especially those who have difficulty focusing on objects at near distances because of presbyopia,” said Dr. Bajenova.

The Symfony® lens improves intermediate (and in many cases near vision), thereby treating presbyopia. The Symfony® toric lens not only corrects presbyopia, but also astigmatism.

“Many of my patients live very active lifestyles and want to see clearly at all distances, and without glasses if possible,” said Dr. Ballon. “With the Symfony® lens, I can give patients the freedom to enjoy the activities that matter to them, while wearing glasses less.”

Traditional Cataract Surgery compared to an Extended Depth of Focus lens
During cataract surgery, the natural lens of the eye is removed, and an artificial lens, called an intraocular lens, or IOL, is inserted into the eye. Many patients still believe the only IOL available to them is a traditional monofocal lens, which only allows the person to see at a distance, with closer objects being out of focus.

“We take extra time during a patient visit to explore IOL options,” said Dr. Wietharn. It takes more time with staff and myself to introduce new concepts but we think every patient should be aware before surgery, whether or not they wish to take advantage of state-of-the-art technology.”
In contrast to the traditional, standard IOL, the Symfony® lens was specifically developed with features to improve both the range and quality of vision.

The Importance of Pre-Surgical Discussions with your Surgeon
“There is nothing as good as the original equipment from the manufacturer when you are a teenager,” says Dr. Ballon. “That said, the Symfony® lens is the best addition to our lens inventory to date.”

Symfony® lens is successful because it provides a continuous range of focus for both distance and intermediate (computer) vision. Patients who continually require absolute fine detailed vision, such as accountants or those who like to read paper, small-print books in bed without glasses may appreciate a comparison discussion over Technis multifocal lens and Symfony®. These patients who have the Symfony® lens may choose over the counter reading glasses (+1.50 cheaters) for fine print. Others who require fine-print access leave behind need for reading glasses by using their computers, smart phones and pads, to do their reading in bed and fine print projects. It is important to discuss comparison options before surgery by sharing your lifestyle and vision expectations.

The Symfony® lens also offers excellent quality of vision without loss of contrast sensitivity. Some patients who may not be a candidate for the Tecnis Multifocal lens due to, say, an epiretinal membrane (wrinkle in the macula) which may decrease contrast sensitivity, for example, may still be a candidate for the Symfony® lens. Presently, it is the only lens on the market that corrects chromatic aberrations, a feature that improves reading ability. The rings are larger than the Tecnis Multifocal lens, so that halos at night are much less prominent. Patients under the age of 60 tend to tolerate the Symfony® lens much better than multifocal lenses. Although the Symfony® lens is designed for bilateral implantation, patients with a cataract in just one eye seem to tolerate the Symfony® lens well, but the full benefits of reading are best when it is implanted bilaterally.

A LifeStyle Worksheet is available for our patients so that they can prepare. Many patients come for cataract surgery consultations with little or no information about what we call LifeStyle lens implants. The Symfony® is one such lens. Much of the senior population have come to accept that glasses are a part of their life. Some will even say that they like wearing glasses. That is fine, if true. Patients who were eligible and chose to have a LifeStyle lens implant continue to tell us how grateful they are to get up in the morning, look out the window, read the time on their smart phone, and remember how good it is to see with little or no dependence on glasses.

TAKE AWAY POINTS:

  • Extended depth of vision was approved by the FDA in 2016
  • Symfony® and Symfony® toric lenses can extend depth of vision: far, intermediate, and near
  • Symfony® and Symfony® toric lenses can offer quality of vision without loss of contrast sensitivity.
  • The traditional lens implant for cataract surgery is a monofocal lens (vision for one point of vision). Reading glasses and glasses for intermediate vision is expected after surgery.
  • To proceed with confidence, prepare by listing your lifestyle vision requirements and expectations before meeting your cataract surgeon.

Download our latest, comprehensive Patient’s Guide to Successful Cataract Surgery, or request an appointment for a cataract evaluation and your surgeon will be able to address your questions on an individual manner after your eyes have been examined with an overall evaluation of your health, life-style and vision potential. Call The Harman Eye Clinic in Arlington today, the first step to life without cataracts.